Friday, September 30, 2011

Doubling Down on Bad Policy

President Obama last week unveiled his plan to reduce the deficit and jumpstart the economy. Unfortunately, it had little to do with the deficit or economic growth and more to do with political messaging. Pushing for tax increases already rejected by Congress and disproportionate cuts to the agriculture sector are causing even members of his own party to question his plan. Many in Congress with better ideas are waiting for him to listen, and we're growing increasingly impatient.
The President has once again decided to be a champion for tax increases. It would be one thing if his proposal was designed to actually help our economy and get our fiscal house in order. Yet even if we doubled the taxes of those being targeted by the President's new "Buffett" tax plan, it would amount to a mere one percent of this year's deficit. On top of that, many of the taxpayers he's targeting are the very people in a position to create jobs – if only the government would get out of the way. We don't have a tax problem, we have a spending problem, and no amount of new taxes will solve it.
The root of our problem is bloated federal spending, and whether we like it or not, entitlement programs are a big part of that. If we don't achieve meaningful reforms to programs like Medicare and Medicaid, they will be in jeopardy for our children and grandchildren. And yet, the President's plan barely addresses these programs. In fact, the additional spending needed to adequately reimburse doctors for providing health care to Medicare patients nearly outpaces the entire entitlement savings outlined in the plan. A real solution means ensuring our seniors and most vulnerable still get the care they need while preserving these programs for the future. President Obama's plan does not do this.
Just as troubling is the proposal for agriculture. In my many visits with farmers and ranchers, I've told them to prepare for cuts to agriculture. They recognize the need to cut spending and are prepared to do their fair share. Yet instead of targeting inefficient and less popular programs, the President is proposing to cut one of our most popular and effective programs, and one that's recently seen significant cuts: crop insurance. Adding insult to injury, the plan also calls for $8 billion in new spending to extend the SURE agriculture disaster program. Most agree this program is slow, unhelpful, and ineffective. While our farmers and ranchers are looking to him for support, he remains deaf to the realities of agriculture.
With our economy still struggling, our debt continuing to rise, and millions of Americans still looking for honest work, it's time for the President to lead. Continuing to pine for higher taxes while turning a deaf ear to our job creators and ag producers is a tremendous disservice to our country. With your support, many of my colleagues and I stand ready with ideas to free our job creators to create, allow our ag producers to produce, and bring us back from the brink of a debt crisis. If only the President would listen.

Thursday, September 29, 2011



The Area Substance & Alcohol Abuse Prevention Coalition
(ASAAP) of Webster County
will be holding an informational meeting
 on  Sunday October 2nd, 6:30pm 
at the
Blue Hill Community Senior Center. 
  Learn how YOU can be a part of helping our mission by PREVENTING alcohol and drug abuse in this community.
Free Meal
Public Welcome
Contact Information:
Pam Schwab 402-756-3095
or
Michelle Kohmetscher
402 469-4046

...................STRAIGHT FROM THE HORSES MOUTH

Duane A. Lienemann,
 UNL Extension Educator,
 Webster County
September 29, 2011 Edition
As I write this column there is a lot of hype in the newspapers, radio, TV and even the coffee shops about the first game that our Nebraska Cornhuskers will be playing within the Big 10 Conference on October 1. Ironically the game is at Madison, Wisconsin and it is against the University of Wisconsin Badgers. I have to admit that I wasn’t all that familiar with their school or even the nickname of their mascot. To be honest I kind of thought that their mascot would be a big chunk of cheese or at least a big Holstein cow in reference to the Dairy State. I do know that when I have watched them on TV that you see a lot of “Cheeseheads” in the crowd. Now to be fair we of course have a lot of “Cornheads” frequenting the crowds at Memorial Stadium in Lincoln too. It is of course all in good fun, a part of college football.
Now it is taking on a completely different tenor and the timing couldn’t be better. If you have read my columns in the past you will remember that I don’t have much use for a group that is falsely called and misnamed “Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine or PCRM”. I have long insisted that the PCRM is a “wolf in sheep’s clothing”. They are nothing more than a fanatical animal rights group that seeks to remove eggs, milk, meat, and even seafood from the American diet, and to eliminate the use of animals in scientific research. Despite its operational and financial ties to other animal activist groups and its close relationship with violent zealots, PCRM has successfully duped the media and much of the general public into believing that its pronouncements about the superiority of vegetarian-only diets represent the opinion of the medical community. They even come on TV ads in doctor’s white lab coat. The American Medical Association (AMA), which actually represents the medical profession, has called PCRM a “fringe organization” that uses “unethical tactics” and is “interested in perverting medical science.” Most of PCRM’s money comes from a single wealthy animal-rights activist in Florida not from dues paying members of the medical profession.
Furthermore, less than 10 percent of PCRM’s members are actually physicians. While PCRM presents itself as a doctor-supported, unbiased source of health guidance, the group’s own literature actually admits 90 percent or more of its members have no medical degrees. And even the five to ten-percent doctor membership that PCRM claims is open to question. Anyone claiming to be a physician or a medical student can join without paying a dime. It is hard for me to understand why a lot of people including the media put any credence into this group. PCRM several months ago, in an article in the Lincoln Journal Star lambasted agricultural subsidies in a piece entitled “Agricultural Subsidies Tax Our Health”. It was written by Neal Barnard who is the president of this organization. They are interested in only one thing and that is a Vegan Society.
You might ask, “What has that got to do with Wisconsin and Cheeseheads?” Well their agenda is now in full display and it happens to be in Wisconsin. This Vegan group put up a billboard in Wisconsin featuring the Grim Reaper wearing a Cheesehead. While I hope that is not going to be an omen for our Husker football team, the obvious message is that the Dairy State’s most notable and tastiest food product is a secret killer – Cheese! Oh my, another provocative billboard meant to beat people over the head with the vegan agenda? Where have we seen that before? Perhaps PETA or HSUS? I wonder if all of these groups are in collusion together. I can tell you one thing - it validates the efforts of several of our state’s Chambers of Commerce, our State Senators, and even our Governor to work to keep these groups out of our state!
In my mind PCRM is really nothing more than PETA’s lab-coated sibling or HSUS’s ugly stepchild. In actuality, PCRM president Neal Barnard is a former science advisor for PETA and used to run the PETA Foundation (now the Foundation to Support Animal Protection). Barnard has upped the ante in Wisconsin. He has actually called cheese “dairy crack” and “the purest form of the [milk] drug.” He also writes, “To give a child animal products is a form of child abuse.”. Unfortunately a lot of our school districts across America have bought into this bunk and are systematically removing milk and milk products from their school menus. That is a whole other story we may have to look at some time.
I would love to be a mouse in the corner of the coffee shop where Wisconsin dairy farmers meet. I bet they would love to have a few words with this guy and his group. Fortunately the group was taken to task as the Wisconsin company (Foamation) that owns the rights to the foam derived cheesehead hats, threatened legal action and PCRM quickly changed the billboard. The anti-cheese billboard is still up…but without the cheesehead! PRCM planned to place a billboard along a main route to Lambeau Field where the Packers play --showing the Grim Reaper wearing a “cheesehead “with the words: “Warning, cheese can sack your health.” I think PRCM is the one that got sacked. The billboard went up OK but…minus the cheesehead. A picture of the billboard with the cheesehead still appears on the PCRM website, but Foamation’s attorney is working on getting that one removed as well. You can find more at: www.todaystmj4.com/news/local/130556058.html/.
PCRM got some media attention, but will such a stupid stunt in Wisconsin really resonate with people? I would bet that it’ll have the same effect as most PETA campaigns—between zero and none. Frankly, I wouldn’t be surprised if Wisconsinites react by offering a lot of ice cream, cheese and milk at Saturday night’s football game. I would also bet that Husker fans will be right with them. Nacho’s with cheese anyone? Go Huskers! Beat the Cheeseheads---umm Badgers!
The preceding information comes from the research and personal observations of the writer which may or may not reflect the views of UNL or UNL Extension. For more further information on these or other topics contact D. A. Lienemann, UNL Extension Educator for Webster County in Red Cloud, (402) 746-3417 or email to: dlienemann2@unl.edu or go to the website at: http://www.webster.unl.edu/ome

Journey ends in Soybean field

Local farmer Willie Alber was trucking soybeans last Sunday at the farm located near Rosemont,  south and east of Blue Hill. About 5:30 p.m he returned to the field after taking a load to the AGP elevator at Rosemont and noticed something different and "strange" out in the field. He walked out and found a bright blue balloon with a small note attatched that had recently come to rest there. On one side of the approx 3 inch square note was a simple drawing made by a child.   "Barb" was written in  childish handwriting in one corner of the note. On the other side was a machine printed message that included the name and address of a church in Hawley Minnesota. Also on the card was a date, September 25th, 2011, the same day the card tied with a little string to the blue latex balloon was found in the soybean field in south central Nebraska.


The balloon had apparently traveled across four states, Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota and Nebraska,  in a matter of hours. Hawley is located in Minnesota close to the border near Fargo,  North Dakota. 
Monday morning Alber found a telephone number for the city hall in Hawley, Minnesota, He called there and got a number to call the church listed in the address.  He talked to a secretary at the church and verified that a Sunday School class from that church had indeed done a balloon launch Sunday morning about 10 am.  Alber plans to return the card to the church so the children involved in the launch will know that at least one balloon successfully travel approximately 500 miles on a nice warm air current and came to rest in a soybean field after its journey.

Theres a lot going on in Blue Hill

Memories~To~Cherish Craft Corner and Blue Hill Floral & Gifts will be holding a Fall Open house on Friday October 7th (10am-6pm) and Saturday October 8th (9am-6pm). Both businesses will be offering refreshments and various specials throughout the weekend. Please call 402-984-2816 for any questions.

Also going on that weekend...Thramers Grocery store will be celebrating their Anniversary and will have the Pepsi Wagon on Main Street (selling brats). Also, Leslie Means will be having a book signing from 10-12 on Saturday at Thramers. Lots of fun going on in Blue Hill. 


Ella B. Bella and the Secret Ingredient is here! Log onto www.ellabbella.com/  to order your signed copy. (Click buy books/gifts, online, from the author to order directly from me!) Plus, check out all the cool extras we have on the site, including coloring book pages and more! Check back often as book signings/store locations are being updated daily. The books are currently available in paperback only. Hardback will be coming later this fall - hopefully in time for the holiday season! If you have any questions, feel free to contact me.

Thanks and enjoy the NEW Ella B. Bella adventure!
Leslie Means
http://www.ellabbella.com/

CELEBRATE

Austin Anthony Alber
8lbs, 15 oz  21 inches
September 27, 2011
Parents Grant and Laura Alber of Tacoma, Washington
Brothers  William and Lucus
Grandparents  Hilarie and Jerry Haack, of Woodbine, GA
Grandparents  Nancy and Cary Smolic of Washington
Great Grandparents Sylvia Alber, Blue Hill, Ne and Jerry Haack, Aurora, Ne

Tuesday, September 27, 2011

David Alan Degener May 8, 1959 to September 15, 2011

David Alan Degener, the son of Madge J. (White) and Robert Degener, was born May 8, 1959 at Red Cloud, Nebraska. He departed this life unexpectedly at his home in Riverton, Nebraska on Thursday, September 15, 2011 at the age of 52 years, 4 months and 7 days.
As a youth, Dave lived in a number of Nebraska communities including Blue  Hill, Red Cloud, Orleans, Axtell and Byron. He graduated from high school in 1978, while living at Roswell, New Mexico. Following the completion of his formal education he returned to Nebraska to make his home where he was employed with WardCraft Homes at Minden.
He was united in marriage with Daphne Powell on May 19, 1989. They lived at Red Cloud, Bloomington and Riverton. Daphne preceded him in death on October 31, 1998.
In 2006, Dave moved to McCook, where he met Carol Ann Bybee. They returned to Riverton where they were married on May 8, 2010. Dave was currently employed with Bladen Sand & Gravel Company.
He possessed a number of interests and leisure time activities. He had a great love for music and greatly enjoyed playing his guitar, mouth harp and composing songs. Dave loved the outdoors, animals and always looked forward to camping and time spent with family and friends.
Preceding him in death were his grandparents; his wife, Daphne; and his step-mother, Sharon Degener.
Surviving are his wife Carol Ann Degener of Riverton, Nebraska; 2 daughters, Tammy Ball and husband Randall of Norton, Kansas, and Dawn Gregory and husband Scott of York, Nebraska; 4 sons, Richard Ulmer of McCook, Clayton Ulmer and wife Dusty of Norton, Kansas, Marcus Ulmer and wife Michelle of Norton and Robert Degener of McCook; step-children, Renae Stuck, Dustin Stuck and Anna Lambert all of McCook; 22 grandchildren; his mother, Madge Bennett of Glen Elder, Kansas; his father, Robert Degener and wife Edie of LaPine, Oregon; a brother, Frank Degener of Red Cloud; 3 sisters, Christina Bacon and husband Butch of St. Joseph, Missouri; Clorissa Najar and Leza Weber and husband Norman all of Marietta, Georgia; other relatives and friends.
Funeral services will be held Saturday, 10:30 a.m., September 24, 2011 at the Williams Funeral Home in Red Cloud with Rev. Audrey Beaty officiating. Interment will be at Immanuel Lutheran Cemetery at Cowles.
A memorial fund has been established by the family.
Williams Funeral Home
241 West 4th Avenue
Red Cloud, Nebraska 68970

NELSON POSTS ONLINE DETAILS ABOUT KEYSTONE PIPELINE PUBLIC HEARINGS IN NEBRASKA

September 26, 2011 – Nebraska’s Senator Ben Nelson has posted on his Senate website information for Nebraskans about U.S. State Department public hearings that will be held this week in Lincoln and Atkinson on the Keystone XL pipeline proposed to cross Nebraska.
“These public hearings will give Nebraskans an important opportunity to express their opinions, offer views and share facts about the Keystone XL pipeline project,” said Senator Nelson. “I’ve posted information on my Senate website from the State Department so that Nebraskans can both follow the hearings and make their views known as the State Department considers the permit to build the pipeline.
“It’s my hope that Nebraskans, including state government, will use these public hearings in Lincoln and Atkinson to make their views known about the pipeline project, its impact and routing through Nebraska,” said Nelson.
Senator Nelson has set up a page on his website on the public meetings to help facilitate public comment. It contains information the State Department provided about how the public hearings will be conducted, how Nebraskans can participate, and the procedures the State Department will follow in gathering the public record on the pipeline project.
For Sen. Nelson’s website, click here: www.Bennelson.senate.gov/
For Sen. Nelson’s Keystone XL public hearings page, click here: http://bennelson.senate.gov/issues/nebraska-xl-pipeline-meetings.cfm/

Continuing to Honor Our Veterans

On Friday, September 23, a group of 25 World War II veterans from the Third District visited our nation’s capital as part of the Hall County Hero Flight. The non-profit Hall County Honor Flight program provides free transportation to and from Washington, DC for local World War II veterans to visit for the first time the National World War II Memorial, which was built in their honor. While in Washington, the group also visited a number of sites, including Arlington National Cemetery, the Air Force Memorial, the Marine Corps Memorial, and the Pentagon.
It was an honor to speak with these heroes during their visit to the World War II Memorial. In a city of memorials and monuments, it is truly a sight to behold as it perfectly captures the unity and dedication displayed by so many from the greatest generation. More than 70 years ago these veterans left their homes and families to defend us against an unspeakable evil, and in the process, faced an unknown future. Their bravery and patriotism continue to inspire the generations which have followed and have enjoyed the freedoms they preserved. My grandfather was a Sea Bee during World War II. He had a profound impact on my life, and words cannot describe how much I owe him – and how much we all owe his generation.
Nebraska has a rich heritage and tradition of courageous military service. Throughout our history, countless Nebraskans have put their lives in danger to protect our freedoms and liberties. Many have made the ultimate sacrifice to keep our homeland safe and secure, and many others have returned home wounded. Our veterans have earned, and deserve, the recognition and benefits they were promised.
Congress has recently worked to pass budgets which still ensure the critical veterans programs many rely on while still making unprecedented cuts to out-of-control government spending. Still, some in Washington and the media are using scare tactics to let veterans believe solving our budget crisis requires cutting veterans’ benefits. Nothing could be further from the truth. Specifically, I voted to protect veterans funding in the House passed budget, The Path to Prosperity, which cuts trillions in non-veterans funding over the next decade but not cutting mandatory funding for programs housed in the Department of Veterans Affairs.
In addition to ensuring veterans receive the benefits promised to them, my office also can help cut the red tape they often face when working with federal agencies. If you or a veteran you know is experiencing difficulty with eligibility determinations, V.A. home loans, replacements of earned medals, or other services provided to veterans, please contact my Grand Island office at (308) 384-3900 or visit my website at http://adriansmith.house.gov/.
As the co-chair of the Rural Veterans Caucus, I understand the challenges facing not only those who served our country in previous conflicts, but also the new generation of soldiers just now returning home after serving in Iraq or Afghanistan. Our nation’s commitment to our veterans and their families remains strong. I look forward to continue fighting for veterans who sacrificed a great deal on our behalf.
For more information about veterans’ issues, the latest developments in Congress, or to sign up for my e-mail newsletter, please visit my website at http://adriansmith.house.gov/

Monday, September 26, 2011

Hastings College 2011 Melody Round-Up parade results

(Hastings, Neb.) - The 60th annual Melody Round-Up Parade in downtown Hastings took place Saturday, September 24, at 10 a.m. The parade included several marching bands from Nebraska high schools and junior high schools and the Hastings College Marching Band. Melody Round-Up is the official Homecoming parade for Hastings College.
Judges for the marching band competition were Mr. Louie Eckhardt of Grand Island and Mr. Dan Sodomka of Aurora.
Three awards were presented: Outstanding Drum Major (chosen from among all bands), Outstanding Auxiliary/Flag Corps and Outstanding Band. Winners received the awards during a special presentation at 11:30 a.m., Saturday at Dutton-Lainson Plaza, 2nd Street and St. Joseph Avenue.
Awards and recipients are as follows:
Outstanding Auxiliary
Hastings Senior High School/Class AA
St. Cecilia High School, Class C
Deshler High School, Class D
Outstanding Drum Major
Torey Kranau and Lauren Reiman – Blue Hill High School
Outstanding Bands
Hastings Senior High School/Class AA
Hastings St. Cecilia/Class C
Deshler High School/Class D


A spirit of excellence has long been the hallmark of the Hastings College music experience. Hastings College students and faculty have been making music from the beginning of the College in 1882. Hastings College is recognized as a National Liberal Arts College in the U.S. News and World Report annual “America’s Best Colleges” issue and a Best Midwestern College by Princeton Review. The Hastings College Department of Music is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music and also was named an All-Steinway School, one of only 82 worldwide.
The Department of Music offers a full range of vocal and instrumental opportunities for all Hastings College students. Major ensembles and small groups travel regularly, making special appearances at music conferences, schools, and churches. Vocal ensembles at Hastings College include the renowned Hastings College Choir, Men’s Chorus, HC Singers (treble voices), Spectrum vocal chamber ensembles, along with other special smaller groups. Instrumental ensembles include the Concert Band, Jazz Band, and Marching Band; Flute, Clarinet, Saxophone, Chamber Orchestra, Brass, and Percussion Ensembles, and the Bell Choir. The department serves as the permanent residence of the South Central Nebraska Children’s Chorale; the Nebraska State High School Honor Choir, Band, and Orchestra; and the Hastings Symphony Orchestra.
Music students can earn a Bachelor of Music degree with majors in applied performance, music education, and piano pedagogy. A Bachelor of Arts degree in music with an emphasis in performance, elementary education, music history or sacred music is also available. Hastings College offers a Master of Arts in Teaching with emphasis in music. In addition, the department sponsors student chapters of Sigma Alpha Iota, Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, Music Educators National Conference, and Music Teachers National Association.

Friday, September 23, 2011

...............STRAIGHT FROM THE HORSES MOUTH

 
Duane A. Lienemann,
UNL Extension Educator,
Webster County
September 22, 2011 Edition
As I write this column I have just finished the first day of four that I will be spending in Omaha for Ak-Sar-Ben. It has changed over the years including a move from its old grounds on 72nd Street to its new digs at the Qwest Center on 10th Street. It first seemed weird to have your animals on cement with roofing paper for traction, but I am getting used to it. The facilities are wonderful as is the air conditioning, along with the filtration of the air. Many of you that had the opportunity to be at the old Ak-Sar-Ben settings would attest to the improvement in air quality that is evident. It is always fun to watch young people compete with their animals and Ak-Sar-Ben is considered the peak for 4-H exhibitors here in Nebraska. I am confident that the youth from our part of Nebraska will once again make us proud.
Farm Safety Week: The typical time frame for National Farm Safety Week corresponds with the start of fall and of course fall harvest. I hope that everyone knows that working in agriculture remains one of the more dangerous occupations in North America. That being said, our farmers, by exercising caution, getting rest and being safety-minded can go a long way toward making it safer for everyone involved. This year’s theme is “Safety Counts – Your Community Depends On It”. Of course we all want our neighbors and friends to keep themselves safe and all of the people around them. Our community truly does depend upon the agriculture industry and the people who work within.
Child Ag Labor Laws: The topic of farm safety is a great segue into a topic that I started last week on the U.S. Department of Labor and its proposal to update federal child labor regulations that was just released a couple of weeks ago. I promised that I would give more information on this topic in this week’s column. I of course believe in supporting safety in agriculture and especially for our youth but sometimes things go a little too far. Let’s review this proposal as it is written.
The new regulations that will affect the agriculture industry will replace the latest regulations as set by the “Child Labor Requirements In Agricultural Occupations” under the “Fair Labor Standards Act (2007)”. This new notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) can be compared side by side with the existing regulations by going on the internet at: http://www.dol.gov/whd/CL/SidebySideNPRM.htm/  These new proposed rules are published in the Federal Register http://www.federalregister.gov/agencies/wage-and-hour-division/ if you would like to read them.
The Act establishes a minimum age of 18 for hazardous work in nonagricultural employment and 16 in agricultural employment. The Act also provides a complete exemption from these rules for a youth who is employed on a farm owned by his or her parent. As I mentioned last week, as I interpret this new proposal, I think it actually revokes certain exemptions for 14 and 15 year-old farm workers, even though the government explanation of the rule says that it does not compromise the statutory child labor parental exemptions involving children working on farms owned or operated by their parents. I want to point out what I consider one of the most disturbing aspects of the rule with so many family farms being incorporated or in LLC’s, the family farm exemption does not apply as universally as implied by this part of the new law:“Where the ownership or operation of the farm is vested in persons other than the parent, such as a business entity, corporation or partnership (unless wholly owned by the parent(s)), the exemption would not apply.” I wonder how many farms will actually be considered family farms since I know a lot of them that are incorporated, in partnership or LLC which would then by that definition kick them out of the exemption for their own kids to work on their farm.
It looks to me that it would also prohibit youth in both agricultural and non-agricultural employment from using electronic, including communication, devices while operating power-driven equipment. It prohibits hired farm workers under the age of 16 from operating almost all power-driven equipment. The department also is proposing to create a new non-agricultural hazardous occupations order that would prevent children under 18 from being employed in the storing, marketing and transporting of farm product raw materials. Prohibited places of employment would include country grain elevators, grain bins, silos, feed lots, stockyards, livestock exchanges, livestock auctions/sale barns, and anything involving hoists. I can think of a lot of high school kids who work in those employments. In short, it will raise the age levels on some specific jobs they consider more hazardous than others. There are also more limitations on works hours.
UNL Extension used to take the lead in training those young people 14-15 to get a certificate so they could work on their farm or others with certain ag equipment. The new regulations also change that. Pages 54851 and 54852 of the NPRM provide a more detailed explanation of their proposal. In their opinion, the 20-24 hrs in the current certifications is insufficient. They are proposing a minimum of 90 hrs or the equivalent of an academic semester in agricultural education. Students must be enrolled in a Vocational Agriculture program at or above the eighth grade to receive certification. Cooperative Extension would no longer qualify as a certifying organization.
Public comment will be taken on this new rule until November 1. If you would like to mail in comments, they must be mailed to: Wage and Hour Division, U.S. Department of Labor, Room S-3502, 200 Constitution Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20210. Those mailed-in comments must include the agency name (including "Wage and Hour Division") and the regulatory information number (1235-AA06). Please take the time to read the new law and respond accordingly!
The preceding information comes from the research and personal observations of the writer which may or may not reflect the views of UNL or UNL Extension. For more further information on these or other topics contact D. A. Lienemann, UNL Extension Educator for Webster County in Red Cloud, (402) 746-3417 or email to: dlienemann2@unl.edu or go to the website at: http://www.webster.unl.edu/ome

Thursday, September 22, 2011

Pheasants Forever to Hold Youth Mentor Hunt October 1

Saturday October 1st the Webster County Chapter of Pheasants Forever will hold their third annual Youth Mentor hunt. This will be one of approximately 67 Youth mentor events that Nebraska chapters of Pheasants Forever will be conducting this fall across the state of Nebraka. The hunt is limited to 16 youth ages 12 to 15 who have successfully completed their hunter safety course.
The event will start at the Rep Valley Trap shooting range near Rosemont beginning at 8 am, Saturday October 1st.
Youth participating in this program will be given instructions in various hunting related topics such as dog training, hunter safety, archary, land owner appreciation, wild life conservation and blue rock shooting. There will be target shooting with 22 rifles. Also part of the day will be an actual pheasant hunt with a mentor and a dog handler. The day should be very rewarding and is designed to target those youth with a strong interest in hunting.
Special permission has been obtained from the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission to allow for hunting prior to the opening of the regular pheasant hunting season.
Activities are expected to conclude around 2:30 with a lunch prepared and served by volunteers from the local PF organization.
Advance registration for the event is required. Jamie Reiman of Blue Hill is the president of the Webster Co. chapter of Pheasants Forever. Other local members who will be assisting with the event include but not limited to Toby Alber, Dave Kohmetscher, Art Lienemann, Mick Doyle, Bob Fontaine   Andy & Vicki Alber . Some members of the Little Blue chapter of Pheasants Forever have also volunteered their services for the event.
This picture was taken on Oct. 1, at the conclusion of the Youth mentor hunt.  Some of the mentors had already left before the picture was taken.  The youth are in the front row with the mentors behind.
Pheasant Forever chapters and Nebraska Game and Parks commission have been combining their efforts to provide Youth mentor hunts since 1996.

Wednesday, September 21, 2011

CELEBRATE

LATEST EDITION TO BLUE HILL POPULATION
EVA RANAE KELLEY 
Parents, Thad and Denise
Sunday September 18, 2011
7 pounds
19.5 inches

HC Singers selected for the 2011-2012 academic year

(Hastings, Neb.) – HC Singers Director Mr. Jesse LaBrie is pleased to announce members of Hastings College’s treble “varsity glee club” for the 2011 Fall Semester. More than fifty female students join college faculty member and community singers for this choir. HC singers perform on and off campus, presenting a varied repertoire including show tunes, popular music, and sacred and secular traditional choral music.
Members for the 2011 Fall Semester are:
Kaitlynn Ayers, Colorado Springs, Colo.
Christine Baca, Fountain, Colo.
Kaylee Baldwin, Hastings, Neb.
Dylann Barbee, Highlands Ranch, Colo.
Whitney Bridger, Silt, Colo.
Tess Bruner, Shelton, Neb.
Stacey Burns, Grand Island, Neb.
Jamie Burr, Kenesaw, Neb.
Lisa Carpenter, Hastings, Neb.
Amber Comer, Phillips, Neb.
Alicia Crouse, Haigler, Neb.
Janina Diedrichsen, Columbus, Neb.
Ana Doane, Lafayette, Calif.
Anna Eliasen, Meeker, Colo.
Heather Faimon, Stratton, Neb.
Angelina Gerhardus, Black Hawk, Colo.
Kara Geweke, Ord, Neb.
Jessica Hazelton, Fremont, Neb.
Rebecca Holloway, Grand Island, Neb.
Christine Horner, Broken Bow, Neb.
Haley Hull, Hastings, Neb.
Makayla Jones, Grand Island, Neb.
Amy Kaestner, Gibbon, Neb.
Lindsey Keeler, Kimball, Neb.
Kelsey Lane, Blair, Neb.
Keeley Lindblad, Hastings, Neb.
Latricia Meek, Yuma, Colo.
Christina Moore, Bellevue, Neb.
Mirae Nakouzi, North Platte, Neb.
Danica Olson, Blue Hill, Neb.
Kimberly Paczosa, Elba, Neb.
Kiley Preisendorf, Grand Island, Neb.
Stephanie Radke, Seward, Neb.
Autumn Rae, Danbury, Neb.
Alexandra Reza, Coronado, Calif.
Angie Rickers, Wymore, Neb.
Christina Rowe, Omaha, Neb.
Miranda Sabater-Wilbur, Bellevue, Neb.
Laura Salyard, Columbus, Neb.
Caitlin Schmidt, Cozad, Neb.
Hannah Seagren, Bloomfield, Neb.
Kristen Semerad, Rogers, Neb.
Alyssa Steine, Loveland, Colo.
Agnes Tompkins, Beloit, Kan.
Jenyfher Torres, Hastings, Neb.
Kelsey Torske, Hastings, Neb.
Sierra Walker, Gering, Neb.
Jaycie Wetenkamp, Plattsmouth, Neb.
Lindsey Wilkens, Castle Rock, Colo.
Sarah Wolf, Hastings, Neb.
Brianna Zubrod, Hastings, Neb.
A spirit of excellence has long been the hallmark of the Hastings College music experience. Hastings College students and faculty have been making music from the beginning of the College in 1882. Hastings College is recognized as a National Liberal Arts College in the U.S. News and World Report annual “America’s Best Colleges” issue and a Best Midwestern College by Princeton Review. The Hastings College Department of Music is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music and also was named an All-Steinway School, one of only 82 worldwide.
The Department of Music offers a full range of vocal and instrumental opportunities for all Hastings College students. Major ensembles and small groups travel regularly, making special appearances at music conferences, schools, and churches. Vocal ensembles at Hastings College include the renowned Hastings College Choir, Men’s Chorus, HC Singers (treble voices), Spectrum vocal chamber ensembles, along with other special smaller groups. Instrumental ensembles include the Concert Band, Jazz Band, and Marching Band; Flute, Clarinet, Saxophone, Chamber Orchestra, Brass, and Percussion Ensembles, and the Bell Choir. The department serves as the permanent residence of the South Central Nebraska Children’s Chorale; the Nebraska State High School Honor Choir, Band, and Orchestra; and the Hastings Symphony Orchestra.
Music students can earn a Bachelor of Music degree with majors in applied performance, music education, and piano pedagogy. A Bachelor of Arts degree in music with an emphasis in performance, elementary education, music history or sacred music is also available. Hastings College offers a Master of Arts in Teaching with emphasis in music. In addition, the department sponsors student chapters of Sigma Alpha Iota, Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, Music Educators National Conference, and Music Teachers National Association.

Friday, September 16, 2011

Helping You Cut Government Red Tape

Congressman Adrian Smith
Much work remains to reduce spending, shrink the size of government, and get our economy moving again. It is an honor to partner with you to craft and support legislative initiatives, such as expanding international trade, eliminating burdensome regulations, and working to pass comprehensive tax reform, which will strengthen the Third District of Nebraska and restore opportunity for future generations. In addition to representing you in Congress, there are many other ways you can receive assistance with issues related to the federal government.
Nominating students to the U.S. Service Academies, flying American flags over the Capitol building, and helping you schedule tours to Washington, D.C. are some of the services available to you. In addition, one of my responsibilities as your Representative is to assist you with navigating the red tape of with federal government agencies.
Today’s world of automated answering machines and confusing procedures make the federal government frustrating. Veterans’ support, taxes, Social Security, Medicare, passports, and small business assistance are some of the examples of agencies and services with which you may need help. Many of these items may be requested through my website at http://adriansmith.house.gov.
To ensure you are aware of how my office can help you cut government red tape, I will host a Constituent Services Seminar for residents in the Third District on Wednesday, September 28. The free event will take place at York College in York, Nebraska from 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. (C.D.T.) with registration beginning at 12:30 p.m. (C.D.T.). For more information about the seminar or to R.S.V.P., please call my Grand Island office at (308) 384-3900 or email RSVPtoAdrian@mail.house.gov.
This event will provide important details to Nebraskans about the assistance you can receive in navigating the bureaucratic layers of the federal government. The Constituent Services Seminar will host select speakers from federal agencies as well as a team of trained constituent services representatives from my office. In order to best address specific questions or needs, the event will feature breakout sessions highlighting a variety of topics such as veterans’ health care services, Social Security eligibility, and assistance with tax related matters.
Dr. Ernie Goss, Professor of Economics at Creighton University, will deliver a keynote speech at the event. Dr. Goss was a visiting scholar with the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office for 2003-2004 and has published more than 100 research studies about economic forecasting and the statistical analysis of business and economic data.
Each year thousands of Third District residents who have questions or need help cutting red tape at federal agencies contact my office. If you are not getting an answer from a federal agency in a timely fashion, feel you have been treated unfairly, or have questions about how an agency works, I encourage you to attend the 2011 Constituent Services Seminar.
For more information about constituent services available through my office, the latest developments in Congress, or to sign up for my e-mail newsletter, please visit my website at http://adriansmith.house.gov.

NEBRASKA BANKS RECEIVE SBLF LOANS TO HELP SMALL BUSINESSES CREATE JOBS

Nelson supported Small Business Lending Fund in vote exactly one year ago today
September 16, 2011 – Today, Nebraska’s Senator Ben Nelson applauded three community banks in Nebraska that have been awarded federal loans to give small businesses more access to capital so they can grow and create jobs.
“This is a direct investment in Nebraska’s small businesses and job creation – especially in our rural communities,” Senator Nelson said. “These community banks will take a relatively small investment from the federal government and leverage it into much more capital that they will lend to small businesses, which will create jobs and help get the American economy back on track.”
The seed money for these small business loans is coming from the Small Business Lending Fund. The SBLF provides capital to financially sound community banks with less than $10 billion in assets. The dividend rate each community bank pays on the SBLF investment is determined by how much the bank is lending to small businesses; the more credit the banks offer to small businesses, the lower the rate the banks pay to the federal government.
The Small Business Lending Fund was established as part of the Small Business Jobs Act of 2010, which became law at the end of last September.
Nelson was an early supporter of the Small Business Jobs Act. It passed in the Senate on a bipartisan vote of 61 to 38 one year ago today, September 16, 2010.
“America’s economic recovery will be driven by Main Street businesses across our country. The Small Business Lending Fund is an excellent example of how the federal government is partnering with private banks to create jobs at private companies,” Nelson said. “Plus, because the federal government is providing loans that the banks will pay back, the SBLF will create revenue. It was a wise investment.”
The non-partisan Congressional Budget Office estimated that the SBLF program will raise $1.1 billion over 10 years from the dividends paid by the banks. Additionally, the jobs that are created will produce tax revenue for federal, state and local governments.
The first three banks in Nebraska to receive funding from SBLF are First State Bank, based in Lincoln; Adams Bank & Trust, based in Ogallala; and Banner County Bank, based in Harrisburg.
“Banner County Bank can and will leverage the initial investment into millions of dollars of new loans that will help our local agricultural producers – farmers, ranchers, and feeders – succeed at what they do. The investment will also help Banner County Bank continue to grow, as we serve new and existing agricultural producers in Western and Southern Nebraska,” explained Banner County Bank Senior Vice President Stephen Stull.
The Nebraska Enterprise Fund, a non-profit organization working to connect small businesses and economic development programs to available resources, has applied for the next round of funding from the SBLF.
“Our role is to fill the gaps for small Nebraska businesses that, for one reason or another, cannot get the capital they need from private banks. We have seen a lot of demand for these small business loans,” said Nebraska Enterprise Fund Executive Director Rose Jaspersen. “Receiving resources from the SBLF would allow us to serve more small businesses that are having a hard time getting a loan. Nebraska businesses need these resources if they are to prosper and grow.”
In a letter supporting the Small Business Jobs Act last year, U.S. Chamber of Commerce Executive Vice President Bruce Josten wrote to senators: “To get the economy back on track and generating jobs, America needs a strong and vibrant small business community. To that end, H.R. 5297 contains many provisions that would allow entrepreneurs to have more access to capital.
“Additionally, the bill contains important tax code changes that would encourage investment, promote fairness, and allow small business owners to retain existing cash flow from operations in order to start, grow, and expand their enterprises.”

............Straight form the Horses Mouth

Duane A. Lienemann
 UNL Extension Educator,
 Webster County
September 16, 2011 Edition
Husker Harvest Days is still one of my favorite venues, even after many years of trudging the miles that it takes to see it all. I first had the opportunity to attend the farm show as the advisor for a bunch of FFA kids who just loved to go to “HHD”, as they called it. I am sure some of it may have been to get out of school, some I am sure was to get all the free stuff --like seed corn hats, pens, flyswatters and yard sticks. They each would bring back sacks, full of treasures, to the bus where they got to show others what they got, maybe trade back and forth, and for sure to reflect on what and maybe who they saw. A lot of them would participate in the Scavenger Hunt that I orchestrated, for the big prize that was given to the student or team that found all the items or got all the signatures. Although those things were the fun part of the trip, I also know that a lot of the kids were genuinely interested in seeing the new innovations in agriculture that were on display. They loved seeing and riding the new tractors, combines and seeing the newest technological wonders.
Oh sure, I am certain a lot of snacks were consumed – popcorn (plain and caramel), peanuts, sausages, milo cookies and roasted soybeans. A lot of them would brag about getting to go to the back of the tents at Pioneer, DeKalb, or a plethora of other booths to sit down to real food. I know for a fact that some students hit several booths, probably all companies that their families did business with. I always marveled at how adept the kids were in working to get invited in for food or talking a vendor out of a rain gauge or seed corn cap. I think it was a chance for these young people to practice their public speaking skills and sales and negotiations technique. It was fun for me for them to come and report back to me where the good tents were, who had the best food or cool gadgets. There was always excitement in their voices that only can be conveyed by youth. It was always gratifying to me as an ag teacher to see kids walking through the fields and watching the machines actually work, or sitting in the livestock building watching the latest techniques and learning about new vaccines, implants, or practices. The main objective of this day away from school was after all --education – but in a different form.
I would, by necessity, build a supply of pens and pencils from Husker Harvest Days. It seemed that I could not keep enough of those on hand for those in my classroom that “forgot” their writing utensil for class, or especially on test days. I made a habit of collecting as many as I could, and then was the lucky recipient of a bucket load from the sacks of the kids when we got home to the old “Ag Barn.” Ironically, it still is hard for me to walk through the many booths that offer up those items and not to pick them up. I don’t seem to go through them like I used to, and in fact probably have build an inventory that will dry out before I ever get to them. The memory still persists however.
One of the reasons that I make sure that I get Husker Harvest Days on my calendar is the people. Where else can you find so many people who have the same interests and background that I or others like me do. I rarely get very far without running into people that I know. Friends, neighbors, old classmates from high school and/or college and of course acquaintances from my work in extension, all fit that bill. It doesn’t take long to find new friends while looking at equipment or learning about new chemicals or seeds. People with similar interests don’t take long to acquaint. What I really like to see are former students, now adults who probably first tread those grounds as an excited, energetic high school kid with no troubles in the world. Some of those “kids’ now come back as parents with spouse, children or even grandchildren in tow, while others work the show as salesmen, managers or representatives. It just doesn’t get any better for me.
Federal Child Labor Laws: The U.S. Department of Labor is proposing to update federal child labor regulations, aiming to improve the safety of young workers employed in agriculture and related fields. While that sounds like something we all want, there are a couple of things that I think people should know. First, it would prohibit youth in both agricultural and nonagricultural employment from using electronic, including communication, devices while operating power-driven equipment. Secondly, it prohibits hired farm workers under the age of 16 from operating almost all power-driven equipment. The department also is proposing to create a new non-agricultural hazardous occupations order that would prevent children under 18 from being employed in the storing, marketing and transporting of farm product raw materials. Prohibited places of employment would include country grain elevators, grain bins, silos, feed lots, stockyards, livestock exchanges, livestock auctions/sale barns, and anything involving hoists.
Most problematic to me is that the new law in my mind actually revokes certain exemptions for 14- and 15-year-old farm workers -- even though proponents says that it does not compromise the statutory child labor parental exemptions involving children working on farms owned or operated by their parents. One of the most disturbing aspects of the rule, and what is expected to be more aggressive enforcement of the issue in 2012, is that with so many family farms being incorporated or even in LLC’s, the family farm exemption does not apply as universally as implied by this part of the new law:“Where the ownership or operation of the farm is vested in persons other than the parent, such as a business entity, corporation or partnership (unless wholly owned by the parent(s)), the exemption would not apply.”
I will touch on this next week in a lot more detail. This new proposed changes to child labor laws were just released last week and public opinion and comments will be taken until November 1. Stay tuned next week for further analysis.
The preceding information comes from the research and personal observations of the writer which may or may not reflect the views of UNL or UNL Extension. For more further information on these or other topics contact D. A. Lienemann, UNL Extension Educator for Webster County in Red Cloud, (402) 746-3417 or email to: dlienemann2@unl.edu or go to the website at: http://www.webster.unl.edu/ome

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

Husker Football Ticket Winners

Congratulations to Angie Scheideler from Ayr, Nebraska and Leslie Pittman from Pawnee City, Nebraska for each winning a pair of Husker football tickets!
The winners were randomly drawn following the Nebraska State Fair and were sponsored by the Nebraska Corn Board and Nebraska Ethanol Board.

September to be Renewable Fuels Month

LINCOLN, NE – To celebrate the success of renewable fuels like ethanol and soy biodiesel – and all the positives that renewable fuels contribute to Nebraska and the country as a whole – Nebraska Governor Dave Heineman will declare September Renewable Fuels Month at Husker Harvest Days this week. The ceremony is scheduled for about 10:20 a.m. Wednesday September 15th, in front of the commodities Building on Husker Harvest Days Main Street.
 Renewable Fuels Month is to celebrate all the benefits renewable fuels bring to Nebraska
Governor Heineman will make a few remarks, as will farmer-directors of Nebraska Corn Board and Nebraska Soybean Board. Olympic gold medalist Curt Tomasevicz will also speak.
“We appreciate Governor Heineman taking time to highlight the benefits of renewable fuels and declare September Renewable Fuels Month at Husker Harvest Days,” said Alan Tiemann, chairman of the Nebraska Corn Board and a farmer from Seward. “Corn ethanol and soy biodiesel are clean burning renewable fuels that provide important benefits to rural communities across Nebraska, the entire state and to the country as a whole. We are excited to highlight their successes and continued opportunities.”
The Nebraska Corn Board is a self-help program, funded and managed by Nebraska corn farmers. Producers invest in the program at a rate of 1/4 of a cent per bushel of corn sold. Nebraska corn checkoff funds are invested in programs of market development, research and education

Quote of the Day

“People are often unreasonable and self-centered. Forgive them anyway.
If you are kind, people may accuse you of ulterior motives. Be kind anyway.
If you are honest, people may cheat you. Be honest anyway.
If you find happiness, people may be jealous. Be happy anyway.
The good you do today may be forgotten tomorrow. Do good anyway.
Give the world the best you have and it may never be enough. Give your best anyway.
For you see, in the end, it is between you and God. It was never between you and them anyway.”
― Mother Teresa

Fall Turkey Season Opens Sept. 15

LINCOLN, Neb. – Fall turkey season opens Sept. 15, and Nebraska has an abundant turkey population as well as hunting opportunities all across the state.
Hunters may shoot turkeys with a fall turkey or youth fall turkey permit, which allows the take of two turkeys, through Dec. 31 with either archery equipment or shotgun.
Fall turkey permits are $24 for residents, $91 for nonresidents and $6 for youth younger than 16 years (residents and nonresidents), including issuing fee.
Fall turkey hunters are required to wear at least 400 square inches of hunter orange on their head, chest and back when hunting during the November firearm (Nov. 12-20) and Earn-a-Buck deer seasons (Nov. 12-22).
Hunters bought 12,241 fall permits in 2010 and had a success rate of 84.6 percent, while harvesting 10,356 turkeys.
Permits may be purchased at OutdoorNebraska.org. Hunters may read the 2011 Public Access Atlas to find public hunting lands.

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

Hastings College’s 5th Annual Bronco Gallop to feature new courses for 5K and 1 mile run/walks

September 13, 2011

(Hastings, Neb.) – Get your gait on at the 5th Annual Bronco Gallop 5K Run/Walk and 1 Mile Run/Walk! Participants may register beginning at 7:30 a.m. on Saturday, September 24th at the Morrison-Reeves Science Center (717 N. Ash) on the Hastings College campus or online at www.hastings.edu/homecoming. The run/walk will start at 8 a.m. Registration is $10 and includes a reusable HC shopping bag.
For the 2011 run/walks – held in conjunction with HC’s 2011 Homecoming/Family Weekend, the college has set new courses which planners hope will make the event more enjoyable for all participants.
“This is a great opportunity for local runners and walkers of all levels to engage with the Hastings College community,” Hauli Sabatka, Senior Director of Alumni Relations at Hastings College, said.
“The Hastings College campus is so beautiful in late September. I strongly encourage people to get up early on a Saturday morning, get some exercise and enjoy the scenery.”
The run/walk is sponsored by the HC Alumni Association, the HC Foundation and the Hastings Family YMCA.
Hastings College, founded in 1882, is a private, four-year liberal arts institution affiliated with the Presbyterian Church (USA). A total of 64 majors in 32 areas of study and 12 pre-professional programs are offered to more than 1,150 students. Hastings College was named among “America’s Best National Liberal Arts Colleges” by U.S. News & World Report, a “Best in the Midwest” by The Princeton Review, and a “Best Buy in College Education” by Barron’s. Visit www.hastings.edu for more information.

The Good Person of Setzuan” first production of the year for Hastings College Department of Theatre Arts

September 13, 2011

(Hastings, Neb.) – The Hastings College Department of Theatre Arts presents “The Good Person of Setzuan” at 8 p.m., Thursday-Saturday, Oct. 6-8 and at 2 p.m., Sunday, Oct. 9 in Scott Studio Theatre.
The Box Office opens Thursday, Sept. 29 and will remain open Monday-Friday from noon to 5 p.m. Tickets are $8 general and $5 for seniors and non-HC students. Call (402) 461-7380 or e-mail tickets@hastings.edu.
Hastings College Department of Theatre Arts presents
The Good Person of Setzuan
By Bertold Brecht and Adapted by Tony Kushner
After years of complaints about the morality of mankind, the gods come to earth to prove that
they can still find good people. In depressed and corrupt Setzuan, however, they only find one,
whom they reward with money. This new wealth becomes her burden as, one by one, people try
to separate her from her money. Her challenge is to keep morality and money at the same time,
in this parable by one of the great playwrights in a new adaptation by Tony Kushner.
CAST AND CREW LIST
WANG – Blake Holen, Oxford, Neb.
GOD 1 – Matt Cashoili, Hastings, Neb.
GOD 2 – Amanda Gasal, Sutton, Neb.
GOD 3 – Joe Hamik, Hastings, Neb.
SHEN TE/SHUI TA – Emily Funkey, Hastings, Neb.
SUN – Patrick White, Omaha, Neb.
MRS. SHINN – Becca Holloway, Grand Island, Neb.
UNEMPLOYED MAN – Jose Jimenez, Lexington, Neb.
NIECE – Myste Shryack, Worland, Wyo.
CARPENTER – Kyle Bell, Julesburg, Colo.
SISTER-IN-LAW – Emma Parish, Sterling, Colo.
MRS. MI TZU – Sallie Myers, Thermopolis, Wyo.
GRANDFATHER – Christopher Jones, Bladen, Neb.
MR. SHU FU – Chris Work, Plattsmouth, Neb.
MRS. YANG – Keeley Lindblad, Hastings, Neb.
WIFE/PRIEST – Jenny Linne, Bailey, Colo.
HUSBAND –Zakary Burns, Oxford, Neb.
POLICEMAN/WAITER – Samantha Colbert, Weeping Water, Neb.
NEPHEW – Nathaniel LaCrue, Lakewood, Colo.
BROTHER – OLD PROSTITUTE – Liz Palmer, Thermopolis, Wyo.
STAGE MANAGER – Robby Collins, Papillion, Neb.
ASSISTANT STAGE MANAGER – Kara Geweke, Ord, Neb.
PROPERTIES CREW HEADS – Sheila Hansen Snell, North Platte, Neb.
COSTUMES CREW HEAD – Latricia Meek, Yuma, Colo.
SCENIC CREW HEADS – Kyle Gallup, Blair, Neb.
LIGHTING CREW HEAD – Beth Wilkins, Omaha, Neb.
BOX OFFICE/P.R. CREW HEADS – Dae Hemphill, Hastings, Neb.
SOUND CREW HEAD – Jenny Linné, Bailey, Colo.
MAKEUP CREW HEAD – Lindsey Wilkens, Castle Rock, Colo.
MASKS DESIGNER – Lara McCoy-Rollefson, Hastings, Neb.
Hastings College, founded in 1882, is a private, four-year liberal arts institution affiliated with the Presbyterian Church (USA). A total of 64 majors in 32 areas of study and 12 pre-professional programs are offered to more than 1,150 students. Hastings College was named among “America’s Best National Liberal Arts Colleges” by U.S. News & World Report, a “Best in the Midwest” by The Princeton Review, and a “Best Buy in College Education” by Barron’s. Visit www.hastings.edu for more information.

Sunday, September 11, 2011

SENATOR NELSON’S MESSAGE ON THE 10TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE SEPTEMBER 11TH TERRORIST ATTACKS

September 09, 2011 – Nebraska’s Senator Ben Nelson today released this message on the 10th anniversary of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on America:
“Americans everywhere remember the shock, sadness and searing images of September 11. On the 10th anniversary of those tragedies we remember the nearly 3,000 people who died, and we honor their families, their friends and their memories,” said Senator Nelson.
“The acts of terror that exploded on that bright fall day smashed steel and crushed stone, but didn’t sever America’s spirit.
“That spirit lived in the heroes—the first-responders, police and firefighters--who responded to the call of duty that morning. It lives in the heroes who’ve answered it since at home and abroad. And it lives in every American today.
“On this solemn anniversary, we know that our spirit and our belief in life, liberty and justice for all are stronger than ever.”

Friday, September 9, 2011

Blue Hill 13 Hastings St. Cecilia 35

Hastings, Ne. September 9  The Blue Hill Bobcats football team lost the  game tonight at Duncan Field  to defending State Class C 2 champions,  Hastings St. Cecilia.

more later

Gov. Dave Heineman Announces Business Expansions Resulting from Reverse Trade Mission

(Lincoln, Neb.) Today, Gov. Dave Heineman announced international business expansions in Nebraska with companies located in Korea, China and South Africa, as part of Nebraska's second Reverse Trade Mission. This year's trade mission, "Bringing the World to Nebraska," has offered trade representatives and international business leaders from 15 countries the opportunity to see firsthand the benefits of doing business in Nebraska.
"I am pleased to announce these international business expansions and investments in Nebraska as the result of our Reverse Trade Mission and the important relationships we have developed with our international guests," said Gov. Dave Heineman. "Any of these companies could have located anywhere in the world, but they are choosing to come to Nebraska. We've had several successful projects to discuss this week including the growing number of international companies who are interested in expanding in Nebraska. These companies continue to cite the relationships we build, Nebraskan's work ethic and our competitive tax incentives as just a few of the many reasons that Nebraska is an ideal home to locate and expand business."
Three Korean and Chinese companies will bring U.S. headquarters to or expand current operations within Nebraska. Additionally, Gov. Heineman signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with a South African company, looking to headquarter in Nebraska.
Located in South Korea, EM Gear, LLC will locate their U.S. headquarters in Omaha for the future manufacturing of gears and gear box reducers. At the announcement, EM Gear CEO, Mr. Daesung Jung, named Nebraska's centralized location, low cost of living and doing business, and the hard-working nature of the people as specific reasons for selection. Mr. Jung is a graduate of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.
Headquartered are in China, Global Choice International, LLC will expand current operations. Global Choice exports a variety of energy products including solar panels, wind turbine parts, transformers and LED products. The expansion will add warehousing and distribution efforts to their sales operations currently based in Omaha. Global Choice International President, Ms. Ping Wang, said Nebraska is the "perfect place for business." She added, "The team in Nebraska was ready to help us overcome unique issues." Ms. Wang said that she now feels at home in Nebraska.
Based in China, SFT America Limited, LLC will locate their U.S. headquarters in Nebraska. SFT America Limited is one of the largest lighting manufacturing enterprises in China, including the production of LED road and outdoor lighting, office and industrial lighting. SFT America Limited President Mr. Jie Shi stated that he originally planned to locate the U.S. headquarters in Los Angeles, CA. Mr. Shi decided to locate in Nebraska instead of California during the Reverse Trade Mission explaining that, "Los Angeles could not do in three days, what Nebraska did in one day." Once the decision had been made to locate in Nebraska, state employees worked around-the-clock with the company to successful incorporate in Nebraska in less than 24 hours.
The MOU signed with South African company Benchmark Timetable formalizes Benchmark's intent to establish a U.S. base in Nebraska to support its growing clientele of schools and colleges. This information technology company specializes in master scheduling for the educational sector. Currently, Benchmark Timetable partners with Fremont-based Sycamore Education providing scheduling solutions for their U.S. clients and schools. Benchmark Timetable Director of Customer Service, Ms. Anny van Niekerk, said that the values in Nebraska fit well with those of Benchmark Timetable, and that she looks forward to working to headquarter in Nebraska.
The Reverse Trade Mission is aimed at encouraging international companies to explore opportunities for investment in Nebraska. Representatives from 15 countries: Argentina, Canada, Chile, China, Czech Republic, Germany, Japan, Korea, Mexico, Russia, South Africa, Spain, United Arab Emirates and Vietnam will be among those participating.

..........STRAIGHT FROM THE HORSES MOUTH

Duane A. Lienemann,
 UNL Extension Educator,
 Webster County
September 9, 2011 Edition
Well I made it through the Nebraska State Fair! I am tired and a little footsore, but was very proud of how our South Central Nebraska exhibitors did with their projects. I can tell you from being right there that the quality of our livestock and static type exhibits don’t take a back seat to too many people. From 4-H and FFA to Open Class, our region was very well represented. I hope that a lot of you got the chance to take in at least one day of the fair. It is fun and gratifying to see our youth and adults interact, help each other, and enjoy an event like our State Fair. Now as I stare at the pile of mail, notes and the long list of emails in front of me, I realize how busy this time of year is.
Grain Sorghum Tour: I really should be going through boxes of material that have been gathering behind my desk, but it seems more satisfying to look at some fields or pastures in the form of tours. I had that chance this week including the Nebraska Grain Sorghum Producers Hybrids Day that was held near Lawrence. There was a nice turn-out for the tour, but it makes me a little sad to see how so many people have unfortunately got away from utilizing this great grain crop. I understand the four letter words usually associated with grain sorghum, but still pine for the days that you saw every section within South Central Nebraska having at least one field of the copper-red heads that let you know there was going to be a crop, even if we were facing some moisture problems. There really isn’t anything quite like a ripe field of milo in the Fall.
Before I get in trouble I probably should explain the four letter reference. It seems when you talk grain sorghum you come up with, of course, milo, but then it seems that you have to add some other four letter words like dust, itch, cane, weed, and cash. I think there are probably others, but I will stop there. I think however that milo gets a bad rap, as I still find that crop as an important factor for an area that is used to a shortage of moisture, dry soil conditions plus producers who have cows or cow/calf pairs. Milo stalks in my opinion are by far the best grazer for fall and winter months.
Pasture Weed Tour: I also had the opportunity to attend a pasture weed control tour near Inavale which featured a new product that is coming out from DuPont. The product is an Aminocyclopyraclor (DPX-MAT28), which is a new generation of herbicides belonging to a family of herbicides known as synthetic auxins. From what I saw we may have a very effective tool to add to our pasture weed control arsenal. I think this new pesticide is slated to come on line the first part of 2013, but may be available in Fall of 2012. I am not sure of the common name that it will have, but think it was Rejuva.
Husker Harvest Days: It is hard to believe that time is upon us already. For you that live under a rock, HHD is September 13-15. I will be helping man the UNL Extension building. If you happen to be there on Tuesday, be sure to stop by and say hello. Speaking of Husker Harvest Day, Nebraskans with private water wells can have their drinking water tested for nitrates at the event. Well owners can bring a cup-size water sample in a clean bottle to the Natural Resources Tent, Lot 1018, at the northeast end of the Husker Harvest Grounds. Tests will be available between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. on Tuesday and Wednesday, and 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. on Thursday. They will primarily be testing for nitrates in the water. Nitrates pose a potential threat to infants younger than 6 months old, pregnant women, and anyone with a weakened immune system. Livestock are also susceptible. If you are concerned or just curious about your water, here’s your chance.
Insects in Soybeans: I have been getting phone calls and visits about some problems in soybeans. I stopped and looked at some fields yesterday and this morning fully expecting to see just some residual damage or shot holes from the work of Bean Leaf Beetles. I did of course find them, and unfortunately I am finding a different type of defoliation --plus some clipped pods lying on the ground. After really looking through the canopy I was surprised to find a bunch of unwelcome guests, Green Cloverworm and a few Fall Armyworms. These worms are working pretty hard on several fields. I am also finding grasshopper damage, especially on the outside edges and along grassed waterways and ditches. I think they are more likely to be the cause of pod loss, although worms can be too. I know several producers who want to spray for these insects, but I think we would be hard pressed to find an insecticide that is readily available that will have less than 21day pre-harvest interval, and has the ability to get the array of insects that are out there. If you feel that you have a problem that warrants spraying, be sure to be cognizant of the days till harvest, insects, and the insecticide rating before you spray.
Good News: As most of you who read this column know, I have been watching the EPA and how they approach agriculture on the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts. Last week President Obama told EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson to pull revisions to the Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards the agency was preparing to finalize. The order came after the administration had come under fire for the costs associated with the rule. EPA estimated implementing the new rules would have cost up to $90 billion a year. Additionally, the new air rules would have left 85 percent of monitored counties out of compliance, making expansion of businesses-including most agricultural operations very difficult.
Most of us that know about livestock, know that the ill-conceived bill that denies the inspection of horse meat and the thus the demise of horse slaughter in the US has had huge negative effects on horses and horse owners. Keep an eye on Congress. The full Senate Appropriations Committee completed their work and their bill does not contain a single provision that prevents USDA from providing inspection of horses! It may just open the way for a return of sanity to the horse world!
The preceding information comes from the research and personal observations of the writer which may or may not reflect the views of UNL or UNL Extension. For more further information on these or other topics contact D. A. Lienemann, UNL Extension Educator for Webster County in Red Cloud, (402) 746-3417 or email to: dlienemann2@unl.edu or go to the website at: http://www.webster.unl.edu/ome

Webster County Educator Receives National Distinguished Service Award

 Webster County University of Nebraska Extension Educator, Duane (Dewey) Lienemann, was awarded with the NACAA (National Association of County Agriculture Agents) Distinguished Service Award at the 2011 NACAA Annual Meeting and Professional Development Conference in Overland Park, KS, on August 7 -11, 2011. Lienemann was one of several honorees who represent the top two percent of the membership selected by their peers and the Director of Extension.
Lienemann has been the Webster County UNL Extension Educator for 11 years, following a highly successful career of 29 years as an Agriculture Education Instructor and FFA Advisor, most of which were spent at Blue Hill High School in the same county. His extension programming emphasis includes all areas of agriculture with primarily emphasis on dry land crop, range, forage, and livestock management. His specialty area is in Beef Production. He is a Beef Quality Assurance instructor and member of the Nebraska LEDRS group. He is an active member of the South Central Cattlemen Association. His capstone program is the Cow/Calf College, held each year at the US Meat Animal Research Center near Clay Center.
He also is highly involved with the 4-H program including the Webster County Fair, Premier Animal Science Events, Youth Livestock Quality Assurance, Livestock Judging, Nebraska State Fair and Ak-Sar-Ben. He served as President of Nebraska NACAA and is currently President of Nebraska Cooperative Extension Association. He was selected to the DSA honor by vote of fellow Nebraska Ag Extension Educators who forwarded his name and particulars to the National Association for consideration.
Lienemann is a native of Ash Grove Township in Franklin County, Nebraska where he attended Wilcox high school. He has lived the last 38 years in Blue Hill, Nebraska where he makes his home with wife Connie. He received his Bachelor of Science Degree from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in Ag Education, Ag Economics and Agronomy in 1971 and his Master of Science Degree in Vocational Education in 1978, also from UNL. His office is located in the Webster County Courthouse in Red Cloud, NE

Thursday, September 8, 2011

Richard Earl McConkey Aug 7, '34 to Sept 8, '11

Richard Earl "Dick"  McConkey passed away Thursday September 8th at his home in Blue Hill.
Funeral services will be held at Trinity Lutheran Church in Blue Hill Saturday morning at 10:30 a.m. with the Rev. Joshua Lowe officiating.  Burial will be at Blue Hill cemetery.  Visitation is one hour prior to services at the church. merten-Butler Mortuary in Blue Hill is in charge of arrangements.
Memoriaals may be directed to Trinity Lutheran Church or to the Hank and Mary Alber Scholarship fund.
 Richard was sent to his Savior on Thursday, Setpember 8, 2011.  He died peacefully at  his home with his loving wife of 56 years by his side.
Richard Earl McConkey was born on August 7, 1934 to Morrison and Naomi (Corner) McConkey in Lincoln, Neb.  At the age of five he moved with his family to Blue Hill. 
Upon graduating from kearney State College he taught high school in Bladen, Nebraska and coached girls volleyball. 
He later farmed  in the Blue Hill area.
 On August 21, 1955 he married his high school sweetheart, Illa Mae Alber at Trinity Lutheran Church in Blue Hill, Nebraska.
 He was a member of Trinity Lutheran Church.
Richard loved attending his children's sporting events.  Throughout his life he continued to dedicate his time to  his family by cheering on his grandchildren at their various sports and activities.  He will be dearly missed by all who loved him. 
Richard is survived by his wife, Illa Mae; two daughters Susie McConkey (Greg) of Overland Park, Kansas and Judy McConkey of Murfreesboro, Tennesse, and son Mick McConkey (Cookie) of Lincoln' ; eight grand children, Ben, Zac and Caleb Newberg, Markie, Mickey and Maddie McConkey, Jennifer Lance and Miles Summers. 
He was preceeded in death  by  his parents.

Regulatory Reform on the Horizon

Congressman Adrian Smith
By law, the Executive Branch is required to annually document and make public the number of new regulatory actions it plans for the coming year. The Obama Administration recently posted information for 2011 online which revealed the regulatory onslaught is not being scaled back, but rather expanded.
According to the report which can be viewed at http://www.reginfo.gov/public/do/eAgendaMain/, the Obama Administration has 4,257 new regulatory actions in the works. Even more troubling is the number of “economically-significant” regulations, which has increased 15 percent since 2010. Of the 4,257 pending regulations 219 will have an economic impact of $100 million or more, the threshold for being “economically-significant.” In its own statements, the Administration said some of these rules will have an impact of tens of billions of dollars. This regulatory thicket causes economic recovery to continue at an anemic pace.
As I travel across the Third District, the message from farmers, ranchers, and small business owners is consistently clear - Congress must act to stop government micromanagement which is smothering private-sector job creation and slowing recovery. One of the top priorities for Congress before the end of the year will be to pursue a regulatory relief agenda. This focus will include repeal of specific rules, as well as fundamental and structural reform to the rulemaking system.
H.Res. 72, which passed the House on February 11, 2011, directed Congressional committees to review the impact on job creation of pending regulations. Since its passage, Congressional committees have been investigating and inventorying overbearing rules. Before the end of the year the House is scheduled to consider repeal of the 10 regulations which most tie the hands of job creators and prevent economic growth. One of the arduous regulations included on this list is the Environmental Protection Agency’s farm dust rule, which directly impacts Nebraska.
The EPA is expected to issue revised standards for its dust rule in the near future, and any downward revision will significantly impact economic growth for businesses and people throughout rural America, particularly farmers, ranchers, and others in the agriculture sector. To prevent a burdensome regulation to our rural economies, the House will act on the Farm Dust Regulation Prevention Act (H.R. 1633), which I have co-sponsored.
In addition to the repeal of specific over-reaching regulations, the House also will consider another bill I have co-sponsored – the Regulations from the Executive in Need of Scrutiny Act, or the REINS Act (H.R. 10). The REINS Act would require Congress to take an up-or-down, stand-alone vote and for the President to approve all new major rules before they can be enforced on the American people. Passing this legislation would provide much-needed accountability and restraint in an era of out-of-control government.
The regulatory burden businesses, both large and small, currently face is reflective of the bureaucratic handcuffs Washington has imposed on job creators. By pursuing a steady agenda to repeal onerous regulations and enact landmark regulatory reform, the cloud of uncertainty hanging over employers of all sizes can be lifted, empowering them to hire more workers and invest in new technologies. For more information about regulatory reform, the latest developments in Congress, or to sign up for my e-mail newsletter, please visit my website at http://adriansmith.house.gov/.

Smith Pro-Growth, Pro-Jobs Agenda Priority This Fall

September 7, 2011

Washington, D.C. – Congressman Adrian Smith (R-NE) today issued the following statement after the U.S. House of Representatives returned to Washington, D.C. to complete the First Session of the 112th Congress.
"For the last eight months we have taken critical first steps on the path to get our fiscal house in order and jumpstart economic growth, but we must continue pressing forward on the remaining work," Smith said. "Continuing to cut wasteful government spending, reducing regulatory burdens on job creators, and approving the long-overdue trade agreements must be priorities of a pro-growth, pro-jobs agenda this fall in the House."

Blue Hill Finishes Third in Minden Tournament

The Blue Hill girls finished third overall at the Minden volleyball tournament Saturday.   Blue Hill defeated Centennial 25-18, 24-26, 25-17, then lost to Grand Island Central Catholic 25-18 and 25-10 before coming back to defeat Valentine 25-20, 26-24 to claim third place. The team played the three matches back to back.
Jordyn Atwater led with 10 kills against Vlaentine.  Lauren Reiman had eight kills and Kaitlin Kumke  followed with six kills. 

Tuesday, September 6, 2011

quote of the Day

“If all the cars in the United States were placed end to end, it would probably be Labor Day Weekend.


Doug Larson

Getting Back to Work; Removing Red Tape

Senator Johanns
September 6, 2011

The American economy hoped for some relief and a much-needed boost of confidence after President Obama signed an Executive Order in January directing every federal agency to review their regulations which have smothered businesses and inhibited job growth across the country. The federal government must avoid putting "unreasonable burdens on business," the President stated, and vowed to make eliminating red tape "the operating principle of our government." As Congress returns to work this week, I'm making it a top priority to peel back obstructive regulations and getting people back to work.
Fortunately, we saw a glimmer of hope when the White House announced last week – 228 days after issuing the Executive Order – the postponement of an onerous smog regulation until 2013. This is great news that will save jobs, but it remains to be seen whether there's more to come or if this is just an exception to a rule of red tape. Several regulations costing the economy over a billion dollars each continue to move forward.
Even as the Administration last week pledged to cut $10 billion in regulatory costs over the next ten years, that pledge was shrouded by reports that it had proposed over $9.5 billion of new regulatory costs in July alone. To date, the Administration has proposed more than 54,000 pages in regulations in 2011, adding more than $69 billion in costs onto our job creators, and thus all Americans who earn a paycheck or buy domestically-produced goods and services.
This is not to say we shouldn't be concerned about environmental protection, but the Administration, ignoring the will of Congress, has moved forward with seemingly little concern for how these rules will immediately impact the economy. There seems to be no consideration for the importance of positively balancing environmental progress with improving the economy, maintaining good American jobs, holding down consumers' electricity costs, or helping to keep American-made products competitive.
These regulations, new and old, become all the more indicting when you consider how long our economy has been stuck in neutral. Last Friday, the August jobs report released by the Labor Department revealed our economy gained no net jobs throughout the month, with the unemployment rate holding at 9.1 percent – more than double that of Nebraska's. Clearly, the words and actions of the White House are not working.
With the Senate coming back into session this week, it's time to make a serious effort toward relieving American businesses from this red tape. I will be pursuing legislation that would put a two-year moratorium on additional federal regulations from the Obama Administration. The time for idle talk is over. Our economy needs a boost, and it begins with removing the red tape that's been inhibiting economic growth. Alleviating these regulatory burdens will give our businesses room to develop and expand; bolster their employees' paychecks; and enable much-needed job creation across the country.

A Decade of Resolve

By  Senator Ben Nelson
Ben Nelson
Nebraskans are among the most patriotic Americans I’ve ever meet. We always remember meaningful days in history. September 11, 2001 is one such day.
It marks that terrible moment in history when America came under attack and 3,000 innocent people were killed in an attack by terrorists.
This year the anniversary has added significance because it marks the tenth anniversary. As I prepare to speak at one of the tributes I wanted to share some of my thoughts with Nebraskans statewide.
First Responders
Each time I see first responders these days it makes me remember watching as first responders answered the call the morning of September 11th, 2001 and the pride I felt, followed by anguish as they gave their lives trying to save others.
While we must never forget those we lost, we must do more than remember them. We must remain vigilant in order to prevent new attacks and new victims.
We have sent thousands of our finest overseas to fight terrorism. We put up with tighter security at airports and more is needed to secure our ports and borders. Our intelligence gathering capabilities need to remain as efficient as possible to prevent future attacks.
A Changed Nation
The tragic events of September 11th, 2001 changed many things about America but there’s one thing they could not change. They could not change American ideals.
We are still a country that puts a premium on our inalienable rights of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. We are still a country that believes in freedom and equal rights for all.
And, we are willing to fight for those rights. We are still a country that flies Old Glory from sea to shining sea, and we fly the flag with more pride than ever before.
It is a magnificent display of American patriotism for the entire world to see. They can see that we have turned anguish into strength and pain into purpose.
Indeed, we are a changed nation. We are more aware that terrorists can strike anywhere at any time but we are not afraid.
The American Spirit
We have turned the adversity of 10 years ago into strength. The acts of terror that pierced the calm of that beautiful morning in 2001 took the lives of 3,000 people. We still grieve for them and their families.
They destroyed landmarks but there’s one thing they couldn’t do. They couldn’t break our spirit. No one can ever do that, which has to be terribly frustrating to our enemies. We are Americans. This is still our country. It’s not theirs.
We drove that point home more than ever this year when we got Osama bin Laden.We showed those who foster terrorism that we value our freedom and we never give up.
Through all, America endures. We remain the land of the free and the home of the brave.